Spring 2017 Workshop Schedule Spring 2017 Workshop Schedule

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Workshops are marked as "Elective" or "Mandatory" for those working toward the PFF Certificate in College Teaching. If you are not working toward the PFF Certificate but are still interested in developing your knowledge and skills as a teacher-scholar, you may attend the workshops on an ad hoc basis. All workshops are open to CGU students, alumni, faculty, and staff, as well as to the 7Cs community.

RSVP for Workshops

To read the workshop descriptions, check out the Workshop Catalog below.

Mandatory Workshops • Mondays • 4:00 PM - 6:50 PM • Burkle 26

Jan. 30

M1. Introduction to PFF: Reaching 100% of Your Students
facilitator: Chase Way

Feb. 6

M2. Teaching Philosophy and Reflective Practice
facilitator: Chase Way

Feb. 13

M3. Changing Contexts in Higher Education
facilitator: Chase Way

Feb. 27

M4. Understanding Learning and Motivation
facilitator: Chase Way

Mar. 6

M5. Course Design: Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)
facilitator: Chase Way

Mar. 20

M6. Course Design: Aligning Assessments to Outcomes
facilitator: Chase Way

Mar. 27

M7. Course Design: Designing Effective Syllabi
facilitator: Chase Way

Apr. 10

M8. Course Design: Pedagogy for Technology Integration
facilitator: Chase Way

Jan. 30

M1. Introduction to PFF: Reaching 100% of Your Students
facilitator: Chase Way

Feb. 6

M2. Teaching Philosophy and Reflective Practice
facilitator: Chase Way

Feb. 13

M3. Changing Contexts in Higher Education
facilitator: Chase Way

Feb. 27

M4. Understanding Learning and Motivation
facilitator: Chase Way

Mar. 6

M5. Course Design: Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)
facilitator: Chase Way

Mar. 20

M6. Course Design: Aligning Assessments to Outcomes
facilitator: Chase Way

Mar. 27

M7. Course Design: Designing Effective Syllabi
facilitator: Chase Way

Apr. 10

M8. Course Design: Pedagogy for Technology Integration
facilitator: Chase Way

 

Saturday Intensive Workshops • Saturdays • 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM

Feb. 11

Saturday Intensive 1: M1 and M2 (McManus 35)
facilitator: Cody Packard

Mar. 4

Saturday Intensive 2: M3 and M4 (Burkle 22)
facilitator: Cody Packard

Mar. 25

Saturday Intensive 3: M5 and M6 (Burkle 26)
facilitator: Cody Packard

Apr. 22

Saturday Intensive 4: M7 and M8 (Burkle 26)
facilitator: Cody Packard

Elective Workshops • Fridays • 4:00 PM - 6:50 PM • Burkle 26

Jan. 27

Academic Integrity: Preventing Plagiarism
facilitator: Cody Packard

Feb. 10

Learning Styles

facilitator: Chase Way

Feb. 17

Engaging Difficult Students
facilitator: Cody Packard

Feb. 24

Grading Strategies

facilitator: Chase Way

Mar. 3

Facilitating Group Projects

facilitator: Elizabeth Craigg

Mar. 10

Socratic Seminars for Critical Thinking

facilitator: Elizabeth Craigg

Mar. 24

Helping Students Prepare for Class
facilitator: Chase Way

Apr. 7

Visual Syllabi and Outcomes Maps
facilitator: Cody Packard

Apr. 14

Effective Feedback
facilitator: Elizabeth Craigg


Workshop Catalog Workshop Catalog

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These are the Mandatory and Elective workshops being offered throughout the academic year. To see the specific workshops offered this semester, please check the PFF schedule or subscribe to the PFF calendar.

Mandatory Workshops

For students earning the PFF Certificate in College Teaching, there are 8 Mandatory workshops. The first 4 workshops help you understand teaching and learning in postsecondary contexts, and to begin a reflective practice process that will guide you in developing your teaching philosophy. The next 4 workshops teach you the principles of course and syllabus design. These 8 workshops prepare you to work on your Practicum and Portfolio items in the next module. You should be able to complete the 8 Mandatory workshops in one semester.

1. Introduction to PFF: Reaching 100% of Your Students
2. Teaching Philosophy and Reflective Practice
3. Changing Contexts in Higher Education
4. Understanding Learning and Motivation
5. Course Design 1: Student Learning Outcomes
6. Course Design 2: Aligning Assessments to Outcomes
7. Course Design 3: Designing Effective Syllabi
8. Course Design 4: Pedagogy for Technology Integration

Introduction to PFF: Reaching 100% of Your Students

This workshop begins your journey through the PFF program and provides an overview of how the different areas of teaching and learning fit together. We will explore and define teaching excellence and the capacities of a good teacher. We will examine how and why we are accountable in our preparing students for their futures. Through this process, we frame teaching as an ethical responsibility we share to ensure inclusive and equitable learning opportunities for our students.

Teaching Philosophy and Reflective Practice

This workshop begins a reflective process for becoming aware of and understanding our assumptions, values, and beliefs about teaching and learning. The workshop introduces you to a Reflections Journal and prepares you to work strategically in the Mandatory and Elective workshops to explore and shape the ideas and perspectives you need to craft your teaching philosophy statement and design a course syllabus.

Changing Contexts in Higher Education

The world is changing radically. The world our students come from is nothing like the world we experienced as students ourselves. Their futures are likely to be even stranger. Are we ready as college educators to prepare these students to succeed in their emerging futures? This workshop introduces you to the global paradigm shift toward a knowledge and creative economy - a technologically mediated, information-rich world marked by rapid and constant change. We will explore the implications of this for us as teachers in college classrooms.

Understanding Learning and Motivation

Learning is a cognitive, affective, and physical process; we are neurologically equipped to learn if we are engaged and motivated. As educators, understanding how and why students are motivated to learn can help us design more effective teaching and learning tools and processes. This workshop introduces you to useful learning and motivation theories. From this we derive fundamental pedagogical principles we can use to design and facilitate learning.

Course Design 1: Student Learning Outcomes

Knowing our destination helps us plan and track a journey more successfully. Effective teaching-learning processes begin with the destination – or student learning outcomes (SLOs). This workshop introduces you to backward design principles (McTighe & Wiggins, 2005) in course design, starting with the SLOs. We will explore learning outcomes taxonomies to create SMART learning outcomes (Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Results-Oriented, and Time-Bound). Bring a syllabus you are developing or revising to maximize your learning in this workshop.

Course Design 2: Aligning Assessments to Outcomes

Assessment must be more than just measuring student performance at mid-terms and finals. A good assessment plan should help both the teacher and learner gauge mastery levels throughout the learning journey. This workshop explores how assessment processes can be aligned to learning outcomes in order to ensure students remain engaged and on track for success in your course.

Course Design 3: Designing Effective Syllabi

This workshop will help you develop syllabi that are living documents and course navigators for students, rather than documents they only look at on the first day and around finals week. We will explore syllabi samples to derive necessary and secondary content, principles of good syllabus construction, and presentation techniques that integrate the syllabus more effectively into the teaching-learning process.

Course Design 4: Pedagogy for Technology Integration

There is no avoiding digital technology in our classrooms. Yet, technology thoughtlessly and gratuitously used is ineffective. This workshop introduces you to frameworks that help us mindfully integrate digital tools and processes in our teaching-learning design so that technology becomes a way to improve teaching and enhance learning.

Elective Workshops 

To earn the PFF Certificate in College Teaching, you must take 9 Elective workshops. Elective workshops focus on classroom processes one must consider to foster engagement, knowledge, and skills. In addition to the regular Elective workshops that are repeated, new workshops are added each semester. You should be able to complete their 9 Elective workshops over two semesters.

1. Academic Integrity: Preventing Plagiarism
2. Academic Portfolios
3. Assessing Your Teaching: Beyond Course Evaluations
4. Creating Classroom Community
5. Designing for Diversity
6. Effective Feedback
7. Engaging Difficult Learners 
8. Facilitating Group Projects
9. First Day of Class
10. Grading Strategies
11. Helping Students Prepare for Class
12. Learning Styles
13. Lectures That Engage Thinking
14. Principles of Online Teaching
15. Silence in Classrooms: a Pedagogical Tool
16. Socratic Seminars for Critical Thinking
17. Universal Design for Learning (Dis)Abilities
18. Visual Syllabi and Outcomes Maps
19. Web 2.0 in Teaching and Learning
20. Working with International Students
21. Writing Workshop: Teaching Philosophy Statement

Academic Integrity: Preventing Plagiarism

Plagiarism is not as straightforward as we might think. This workshop looks at different forms of plagiarism including "accidental" plagiarism. We will explore strategies for preventing plagiarism as well as finding teachable moments when we discover plagiarism.

Academic Portfolios

What's an academic portfolio? Do I really need one? What's included in it? How do I build one? This workshop helps you explore the importance of academic portfolios and best practices for using them strategically to develop your career as a researcher/scholar and educator. As part of this exploration, we will each create a draft sketch of our own academic portfolio.

Assessing Your Teaching: Beyond Course Evaluations

We know formative assessment and feedback are critical to helping students engage and master knowledge and skills. What about feedback for teachers? This workshop will use principles from reflective practice to help you think beyond end-of-course evaluations to design ways to gather feedback about your teaching. We will explore self-assessment strategies as well as mid-semester student feedback.

Creating Classroom Community

Students are more engaged in learning when they are in a meaningful and safe learning space (McMillan & Chavis, 1986). In this workshop we will explore what is means to be part of a community and how that is different to being part of a team. Through this exploration, we will derive principles and strategies for nurturing classroom communities that optimize learning.

Designing for Diversity

This workshop lays the foundations for developing inclusive pedagogy and nurturing plural, agile mindsets that embrace differences. We will explore multiple overt and hidden identities that affect classroom community and learning. Using the metaphor of relationships, we will examine the values and assumptions we and our students bring to classroom interaction and derive principles of plurality or multiplicity for developing classroom cultures of connection, respect, and empathy.

Effective Feedback

Feedback tells us where we are in relation to our goals, thus giving us the opportunity to re-calibrate and improve our efforts toward success. But often, feedback frustrates and dismays students. This workshop explores different strategies and activities (written and oral) that can help provide timely, strategic, and meaningful feedback that will help students improve their learning.

Engaging Difficult Learners

What is a difficult learner? They can be rude and rebellious, loud and lackadaisical, disrespectful and disruptive. They can also be moody and marginalized or silent and sullen. Also difficult are introverted and introspective students, as are the creative ones. Over-confident and under-confident students are equally difficult. "DIFFICULT" then becomes a diffcult descriptor. This workshop explores strategies to be observant, calm, and responsive in ways that give you the best chance to diffuse troubling patterns of interaction in your class and to proactively invite engagement.

Facilitating Group Projects

When group projects work well, they offer engaging and rich learning processes that not only help students master content but also nurture critical skills for success such as inter-personal skills, leadership, reflection, and self-management. This workshop explores principles for integrating group projects in our courses and strategies for optimizing results while avoiding the potential pitfalls for participation and learning engagement.

First Day of Class

The first day of class can be intimidating and bewildering for both teacher and student. But, with good planning and the right strategies, what we do on the first day of class can set the tone and establish a strong game plan for the rest of the semester. This workshop explores principles for building community, clarifying learning processes, and developing a First Day plan that you can use.

Grading Strategies

Grading can be a nightmare for both professors and students. Students dread getting back grades, often disregarding comments we have spent what seems an inordinate time writing. This workshop explores strategies to develop a student-focused grading plan that helps students to improve mastery levels from one assignment to the next.

Helping Students Prepare for Class

We design teaching with the hope that our students will prepare, that they will actively read the assigned material, and come to class ready to learn. But do they? And why not? This workshop helps us understand common barriers to preparation and covers strategies to scaffold preparation so that students are better able to be active, engaged learners in class.

Learning Styles

To teach inclusively means to differentiate learning processes so that no student is left behind. This workshop explores the myth of learning styles and reframes learning styles as modalities or representation and multi-literacies: visual, auditory, kinesthetic, text- or number-based, logical, interpersonal, and intrapersonal, among others. This workshop examines strategies to include all students while supporting each one to expand his or her learning and communication range.

Lectures That Engage Thinking

Lectures are a college instruction staple that have been criticized as boring and useless. Yet, mindfully designed lectures can engage students in active learning processes, even in large classes. This workshop introduces strategies for developing lectures that lead students in actively thinking and learning as a group. We will explore basic lecture dynamics (pace, tone, body language, signposting) and strategies for learning interaction within a lecture.

Principles of Online Teaching

Online learning, with its advantages of being location free and flexible in structure has helped to increase access to education. It can be a powerful ally for inclusive pedagogy. However, online teaching requires a shift in how we think about and design learning processes. We cannot simply replicate what we do in physical classrooms into an online space. This workshop introduces you to principles for designing and facilitating effective online teaching.

Silence in Classrooms: a Pedagogical Tool

SILENCE - it's seen as awkward, even threatening. Students and teachers feel uncomfortable when silence descends and seems to dampen classroom interaction. This workshop surfaces our assumptions and beliefs about silence. We will explore how we can use silence intentionally to engage learners, support thinking, and enhance discussion and deep learning.

Socratic Seminars for Critical Thinking

This workshop introduces you to the concept of a Socratic Seminar, a mode of discussion and inquiry based on using critical thinking questions to probe a topic. Learn how to apply questioning as a way of learning to engage students in a more robust exploration of multiple perspectives on a topic.

Universal Design for Learning (Dis)Abilities

In this workshop, we will explore the ability-disabilities continuum both visible and invisible that is present in our classrooms. The workshop will help us understand principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) that ensure mindful attention to creating equitable access and opportunities for success for all students.

Visual Syllabi and Outcomes Maps

This hands-on workshop based on Linda Nilson's book The Graphic Syllabus and Outcomes Maphelps you think about how you can visualize and sequence your learning outcomes and your syllabus. This can help students better understand the learning process in your course and the pathways to achieving the expected outcomes. In the process, you gain clarity on how your outcomes, assessments, and teaching are coherently connected.

Web 2.0 in Teaching and Learning

Web 2.0 tools such as social networking sites, blogs, image and video-sharing sites, and wikis are changing the flow and use of information in teaching and learning. This workshop explores the opportunities Web 2.0 tools provide for students to engage in and develop higher-order thinking skills and information literacy in searching, finding, evaluating, selecting, and connecting information, even as they develop disciplinary content knowledge. We will also explore best practices in integrating and managing the use of Web 2.0 tools for teaching and learning.

Working with International Students

We see increasing numbers of international students in college classrooms. They are savvy global citizens. While culture shock seems a thing of the past, many experience isolation especially with adjustment to American academic norms. This workshop builds awareness of the multiple facets of academic and social adjustment that international and American students experience in working together, and how we can address challenges and better use the opportunities that diverse global cultures, values, and learning norms bring to our classrooms.

Writing Workshop: Teaching Philosophy Statement

This workshop focuses on the writing and revising process in writing your Teaching Philosophy Statement. We will work on how you can use a rubric to draw from and structure your workshop reflections and notes, as well as self- and peer-review strategies to develop a concise but comprehensive Teaching Philosophy Statement. Bring your reflections and notes, as well as any rough drafts you have done so far.